Hello, I’m back. 

We bloggers have to imagine an audience to create one.  In my mind, you have visited this site every week and been disappointed to find that I haven’t written a new blog.

I’ve read and viewed heaps since I last wrote, but my job is driven by human imperatives.  They combine to make it impossible for me to complete one of my “slow blogs”, even at 1.00 a.m. when I am sometimes still replying to emails. 

A marvellous website that offers a blog that isn’t a blog is Geeksugar.  It’s not for me, but it has a great name.  It blends celebrity sugar with Geek technonews and offers constant updates that are a bit like a Yum Cha meal…. You keep coming back for just-one-more-thing until you find you have over-ordered and over-eaten. 

Consider one of its latest postings, time-logged 11.00 a.m. Sunday, which reads:
“I'm smitten over the latest site trend: bookmarking and displaying collections of your favorite things in a beautiful, visually stimulating way. Pinterest is one such site, allowing users to create a category and post photos of clothing, products, books, or anything else to create a visually stimulating virtual inspiration board” (Geeksugar). 

The site’s next posting was time-logged 2.00 a.m. Sunday.  Now that’s what I call Yum Cha! 

In my case, it’s more like the slow-food movement, except I am possibly the world’s slowest-blogger.  If I was as clever as the creators of Geeksugar, I could compress that into a great pseudonym, like “Slogger”.  (I’m not sure how well that would go.) 

So instead, I am inviting YOU to send me a blog about social media that I can post, under your name, as a contributor-blogger: No! I don’t want you to think of yourself as a “clogger”, although that is my topic for this piece.  So go ahead: If it is original, relevant and legal, I will publish it. 

However, let’s return to clogging.  The internet is in danger of becoming clogged.  Read on: 

There are recent reports about the limits to the number of domains left on the internet and suggestions that the Web may have to be reconfigured if it is not to run out of domains.  At the same time, New Zealand is vaunting “fibre to the door”, to increase the country’s broadband capacity and speed.  

To make it even harder to keep up with demand for capacity, Jon Fortt, senior technology writer in Fortune magazine declares 2010 to be “the year of the internet video”.  He says that Teleconferencing can cut business travel costs by $US3.5 billion a year by 2012.  Smartphones and camcorders that will fit in your pocket will increase the size of this video tsunami (Fortune, May 24, 2010). 

In the same issue, his colleague, Michael Copeland, argues that the seismic force pushing this wave is actually “folk who sell corporate networking gear”.   

Whatever the cause, the flood of “VJ”s could block organisational networks, just as iPhone is doing to AT&T’s network, says Fortte.  To which Copeland responds that IT knows how to block rogue services. 

What they agree is that some video usage will enhance organisational communication, but it will require investment on capacity and security.  They also agree that it should be well-managed and used in moderation. 

This looks like another job for “super-communicator” – sobriquet, “s’c’ater”, which has a slightly better ring to it than slogger.

 Joseph Peart   joseph.peart@aut.ac.nz
 


Comments

10/23/2010 18:05

You see, "Practice makes perfect. " I wish that practice bring us progress somewhat.


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